2010 Commemorative Coins Information

by US Coins Staff on January 31, 2010

in Coin Information

Boy Scouts Silver Dollar Obverse Final Coin Design - Click to Enlarge

Boy Scouts Silver Dollar Obverse Final Coin Design - Click to Enlarge

While its primary function is to provide circulating coinage, every year the United States Mint also strikes special commemorative coins whose purpose is not only to celebrate and honor selected people, places and events, but to provide additional funds for organizations related to the theme of the coin created -- as dictated by law.

There are two commemoratives up for issue this year -- the 2010 American Veterans Disabled for Life Silver Dollar and the 2010 Boy Scouts of America Centennial Silver Dollar. Each honors a group of people who have enriched the lives of Americans in one way or another. And through the proceeds of these respective coins, some of their goals for the future are helped.

Additional information on the two 2010 Commemorative Coins is provided below.

2010 American Veterans Disabled for Life Silver Dollar

With a release slated for February, 25, 2010, the American Veterans Disabled for Life coin honors those individuals who made immensely personal sacrifices in the service of their country. Left with wounds and scars from their service, these individuals bear the mark of their loyalty to duty.

These coins will be struck to either proof or uncirculated quality from 90% silver and 10% copper to a diameter of 1.5 inches. A maximum of 350,000 will be produced across all product options.

On the obverse of the coin the legs of three disabled veterans are shown while the reverse contains an image of forget-me-not flower at the base of a wreath of oak branches. United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart designed and sculpted the obverse. The reverse was designed by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program Master Designer Thomas Cleveland and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Norm Nemeth.

$10 from the sale of each coin will be forwarded to the Disabled Veterans' LIFE Memorial Foundation for the construction of a memorial in Washington D.C.

2010 Boy Scouts of America Centennial Silver Dollar

The Mint shows a release date of March 23, 2010, for the coin celebrating 100 years of the Scouting organization in America. Directly affecting an estimated 110 million Americans who were members of the Boy Scouts of America since its inception, the group still boasts ranks of 3 million youth.

Also struck from a 90% silver, 10% copper blend, the coins weigh a nominal 26.730 grams with a diameter of 1.5 inches. Only 350,000 of the coins will be struck across all product options including the proof and uncirculated versions.

The obverse depicts three saluting youth members of the Boy Scout organization, a Cub Scout, A Boy Scout and a female Venturer. Each is in full uniform. It was designed by Artistic Infusion Program Master Designer Donna Weaver and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Charles Vickers. On the reverse, the Boy Scout Emblem is found as engraved by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Jim Licaretz.

A surcharge of $10 will be added to each coin with that money being sent to the National Boy Scouts of America Foundation which in turn will grant the money to local councils to improve the reach of the organization into hard-to-serve areas.

Since the introduction of the modern commemorative program in 1982, an estimated $418 million dollars has been raised for the recipient organizations.

For additional information, also read:

Commemorative Coins History

Commemorative coinage is not a new concept for the Mint. As far back as the 1800's, special coins have been struck to mark special occasions or to draw attention to historical events. Some samples of these include the 1892-1893 Columbian Exposition Half Dollar, the 1926 Sesquicentennial of American Independence Half Dollar, the 1936 Battle of Gettysburg Half Dollar and even a 1936 Elgin, Illinois Centennial Half Dollar.

Modern commemoratives really started in 1982 with the George Washington 250th Anniversary Half Dollar and includes literally dozens of different coins all the way through last year's immensely popular Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commemorative Silver Dollars.

Commemorative coins are born though the legislation process. With enough support, the legislation is passed by Congress and then signed into law by the President. The law provides the US Mint with the necessary guidelines for each coin.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

tamara March 15, 2010 at 1:03 pm

can you send me information on the 2010 paralympic coin that has the united states of america on one side and the paralympics on the other. i enjoyed this website but i can’t find my coin on it. if you can help i would really appreciate it. thank you.

tamara March 15, 2010 at 1:05 pm

can you send me information on the 2010 paralympic coin that has the united states of america on one side and the paralympics on the other. i enjoyed this website but i can’t find my coin on it. if you can help i would really appreciate it. thank you. the coin i have is a quarter.

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